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5 stunning stats about Google

    Imagine one day buying an Android smartphone not through Verizon, AT&T, Sprint or T-Mobile -- but with Google Wireless. That day could be coming soon. Google (GOOGL, Tech30) will start selling cell phone service along with its Android phones, according to multiple news reports. This has been a long time coming. For years, Google has been assembling just about all the pieces it needs to become a mobile provider.         The search giant already makes the most-used mobile software on the planet, it designs and sells phones online, and it has become an Internet service provider with its Google Fiber initiative. It even has its own VoIP phone service called Google Voice, which allows people to get a Google phone number and call people through Gmail or Hangouts over Wi-Fi. The missing link has been the cell towers needed to build out a nationwide network. Rather than spending the tens of billions of dollars it would cost to create a wireless network, Google reportedly will carry its service over Sprint (S) and T-Mobile's (TMUS) networks. Google declined to comment.           Google is expected to pay those carriers just $2 per gigabyte, according to Macquarie Securities analyst Kevin Smithen. That means Google could choose to provide super-cheap service that gives Verizon (VZ, Tech30) and AT&T (T, Tech30) something to worry about. Related: T-Mobile rejects half of its customers because of bad credit         Adding Google to an already competitive field that is in the middle of a major price war isn't likely to make the big carriers very happy -- that's why smaller carriers Sprint and T-Mobile are helping Google. But T-Mobile and Sprint, in particular, are being cautious about the deal. Sprint worked a usage cap into its contract with Google that would allow the wireless company to renegotiate its deal if Google signs up a ton of customers, according to the Wall Street Journal. That could happen. In 2018, Smithen believes Google will pay Sprint $750 million and T-Mobile $250 million for its service. That means even if Google chooses to break even, it could sell $1 billion in wireless services just three years from now.           But the chances of Google surpassing any one of the Big Four wireless carriers is practically nil. Existing carriers don't want wireless service to become a commodity. Short of building out its own wireless network, Google will have to go through one of the Big Four to get national coverage.                     Still, the plan makes sense for Google. Google makes money on Android by licensing the software to smartphone makers and by driving customers to use its apps and search services. Rather than relying on wireless companies to provide service, Google Wireless would give the search company the ability to deal directly with its customers. There have already been a few skirmishes between Google and the cell phone companies that threaten Google's business. Over the past few years, Verizon has banned Google's Wallet app and made Microsoft's Bing the default search engine in some of its Android phones. Also, Google has spoken out against the data caps AT&T and Verizon put on customers, as well as T-Mobile's slowing of customers' speeds once they reach a certain limit.           Google is hardly the first to try its selling wireless service. Best Buy (BBY), Staples (SPLS) and Wal-Mart (WMT)all offer wireless plans to their customers. LightSquared, a failed wholesale 4G carrier, tried to become the backbone for so-called mobile virtual network operators around the country. (The FCC determined that its spectrum interfered with GPS signals, and it ultimately went bankrupt). If successful, Google's plan could pave the way for Apple (AAPL, Tech30) to sell its own wireless service with every iPhone. And Facebook (FB, Tech30) and other companies with a vested interest in connecting people to the Internet could get involved too. But there's a lot of risk associated with being a wireless carrier too. When service inevitably goes down or connections fail, customers will blame Google -- not Sprint or T-Mobile -- for the disruptions.
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Are you an iPhone user? Congratulations! You're probably smarter than the Android owner sitting next to you.

    A new study conducted by online advertising network Chitika found that states with more college graduates tend to also have higher iPhone sales.   Alaska (66%), Montana and Vermont have the largest percentage of iPhone users. New Mexico (41%), Iowa and Delaware have the lowest share of iPhone sales per capita. Notably, Chitika found that increased wealth is also linked to greater iPhone sales -- but since college degrees also correlate with higher incomes, Chitika says those results are redundant.         Other studies have found similar results. Rich, white males tend to buy more iPhones, particularly in the first weeks that they go on sale. In the first month of sales, nearly 80% of iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus buyers in the United States were male, and more than 60% made over $75,000 a year, according to Slice, a company that tracks consumer purchases.   Smarter people use iPhones - study                    

Related: Vast majority of iPhone 6 buyers are rich, white men

    The study also notes that iPhone sales correlate to population density. The more densely populated the state, the greater the chance that iPhone sales will be higher in that state.     On a whole, Google's (GOOGL, Tech30) Android sales are significantly higher than Apple's (AAPL, Tech30) sales, but the iPhone remains the single most popular smartphone in the United States. More than 42% of U.S. smartphones are iPhones, according to comScore. Runner-up Samsung commands 28% of the U.S. market.     Yet it's important to take Chitika's results with a grain of salt. Even Chitika admits that its results "are not comprehensive." Because the company focused on states and not smaller regions, such as cities or neighborhoods, the results lack "a great deal of granularity." Here's the state-by-state breakdown, according to Chitika.         Alaska: 65.5% Montana: 60.1% Vermont: 59.4% Hawaii: 58.7% Mississippi: 58.7% Connecticut: 58.1% Massachusetts: 56.6% New York: 56.2% Kansas: 55.6% New Jersey: 55.3% California: 53.3% Louisiana: 53.3% South Dakota: 52.9% West Virginia: 52.4% New Hampshire: 52.1% Rhode Island: 52% Illinois: 51.5% Georgia: 50.8% Idaho: 50.8% Kentucky: 50.5% Nevada: 50.5% Arkansas: 50.4% Maine: 50% Virginia: 50% Oregon: 49.7% Pennsylvania: 49.5% Wyoming: 49.5% Nebraska: 49% Utah: 49% North Dakota: 48.5% Colorado: 48.3% Minnesota: 48.3% Tennessee: 48.0% Maryland: 47.8% South Carolina: 47.2% Alabama: 47.1% Ohio: 46.3% North Carolina: 46.2% Florida: 45.8% Oklahoma: 45.1% Texas: 44.9% Arizona: 44.6% Indiana: 44.6% Michigan: 43.8% Missouri: 43.6% Washington: 43.6% Wisconsin: 43.1% Delaware: 42.2% Iowa: 42.1% New Mexico: 40.5%
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Humans should be worried about the threat posed by artificial Intelligence, Bill Gates has said.

  The Microsoft founder said he didn't understand people who were not troubled by the possibility that AI could grow too strong for people to control. Mr Gates contradicted one of Microsoft Research's chiefs, Eric Horvitz, who has said he "fundamentally" did not see AI as a threat. Mr Horvitz has said about a quarter of his team's resources are focused on AI. During an "ask me anything" question and answer session on Reddit, Mr Gates wrote: "I am in the camp that is concerned about super intelligence. First the machines will do a lot of jobs for us and not be super intelligent. That should be positive if we manage it well.     "A few decades after that though the intelligence is strong enough to be a concern. I agree with Elon Musk and some others on this and don't understand why some people are not concerned."       His view was backed up by the likes of Mr Musk and Professor Stephen Hawking, who have both warned about the possibility that AI could evolve to the point that it was beyond human control. Prof Hawking said he felt that machines with AI could "spell the end of the human race". Mr Horvitz has said: "There have been concerns about the long-term prospect that we lose control of certain kinds of intelligences. I fundamentally don't think that's going to happen." He was giving an interview marking his acceptance of the AAAI Feigenbaum Prize for "outstanding advances" in AI research.   Artificial-Intelligence-Microsoft's Bill Gates insists AI is a threatwith-Human                 "I think that we will be very proactive in terms of how we field AI systems, and that in the end we'll be able to get incredible benefits from machine intelligence in all realms of life, from science to education to economics to daily life." Mr Horvitz runs Microsoft Research's lab at the parent company's Redmond headquarters. His division's work has already helped introduce Cortana, Microsoft's virtual assistant. Despite his own reservations, Mr Gates wrote on Reddit that, had Microsoft not worked out, he would probably be a researcher on AI. "When I started Microsoft I was worried I would miss the chance to do basic work in that field," he said.       "I think that we will be very proactive in terms of how we field AI systems, and that in the end we'll be able to get incredible benefits from machine intelligence in all realms of life, from science to education to economics to daily life."  Mr Horvitz runs Microsoft Research's lab at the parent company's Redmond headquarters. His division's work has already helped introduce Cortana, Microsoft's virtual assistant.  Despite his own reservations, Mr Gates wrote on Reddit that, had Microsoft not worked out, he would probably be a researcher on AI.  "When I started Microsoft I was worried I would miss the chance to do basic work in that field," he said.               He added that he believed the firm he founded would see "more progress... than ever" over the next three decades. "Even in the next 10 [years,] problems like vision and speech understanding and translation will be very good." He predicted that, in that time, robots would perform tasks such as picking fruit or moving hospital patients. "Once computers/robots get to a level of capability where seeing and moving is easy for them then they will be used very extensively." He said he was working on a project with Microsoft called "Personal Agent", which he said would "remember everything and help you go back and find things and help you pick what things to pay attention to". He wrote: "The idea that you have to find applications and pick them and they each are trying to tell you what is new is just not the efficient model - the agent will help solve this. It will work across all your devices."       But he admitted that he felt "pretty stupid" because he cannot speak any language other than English. "I took Latin and Greek in High School and got As and I guess it helps my vocabulary but I wish I knew French or Arabic or Chinese. "I keep hoping to get time to study one of these - probably French because it is the easiest... Mark Zuckerberg amazingly learned Mandarin and did a Q&A with Chinese students - incredible," he wrote.
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